What healthcare leaders need to know now

 

Classic content from 2015 Top 25 Women in Healthcare: Maureen Bisognano from the IHI

By | October 30th, 2015 | Blog | Add A Comment

 

Maureen Bisognano: “There is no way that healthcare can be provided by a specific discipline anymore.”

 

Classic content from 2015: One in a series of interviews with Modern Healthcare’s Top 25 Women in Healthcare for 2015.

 

For the last 20 years, it’s been common for healthcare executives to look to the aviation industry for both inspiration and best practices in improving quality and safety. But Maureen Bisognano, CEO of the Institute for Healthcare Improvement, thinks perhaps we should look beyond the horizon for the next step.

 

“Twice this year, IHI has led a study tour down to NASA,” says Bisognano, who is retiring at the end of the year. “When you walk into NASA, there is a wall that tracks the journey of a space shuttle from when it comes onto the launch pad until it returns safely back home.”

 

That board also tracks every near-miss, equipment failure, employee injury and fatality that has happened across the shuttle program. And when teams see that wall, that gets them thinking about the depth of the details in such transparency.

 

“Nobody in healthcare understands safety that way,” she says. “If we make an analogy to healthcare, the left side of the map might answer questions like: Have we safely admitted patients into the hospital? Do we understand everything about that patient’s care and life outside the hospital, and have we brought that knowledge to the people who will be caring for that patient in the hospital?”

 

The other side of the board, Bisognano says, could provide responses to the question, “Have we safely guided this patient back into the community with access to medications, food and care?” Looking at healthcare issues from a different angle is standard operating procedure at the IHI, which can usually be found on the cutting edge of health innovation. And, while it is true that the healthcare industry is adjusting to some of the biggest changes in its history under the Affordable Care Act, it’s Bisognano’s belief that the current disruptions are small compared to what’s coming down the pike.

 

“I think leadership is in the midst of a transition,” she says. “Leaders are going to be out in the community in ways they never were before. They’re going to begin to understand what it’s like to live in a particular neighborhood –how can their hospital or physician practice or ACO create health in that environment? They’re going to be looking way outside the walls of the organization. I think they’re going to be challenged by managing multi-professional teams, because there is no way that healthcare can be provided by a specific discipline anymore.”

 

Those are bold words, but Bisognano says that scenario is the end result of what it means to move “upstream” into a community to deliver care, a concept that has been around for years but is gaining new urgency as hospitals and health systems seek to prevent readmissions. And data is the key to that, Bisognano notes. Read more…

 

 

Maureen Bisognano looks beyond the healthcare silo for improvement

By | October 16th, 2015 | Blog | Add A Comment

 

Maureen Bisognano: “There is no way that healthcare can be provided by a specific discipline anymore.”

 

One in a series of interviews with Modern Healthcare’s Top 25 Women in Healthcare for 2015.

 

For the last 20 years, it’s been common for healthcare executives to look to the aviation industry for both inspiration and best practices in improving quality and safety. But Maureen Bisognano, CEO of the Institute for Healthcare Improvement, thinks perhaps we should look beyond the horizon for the next step.

 

“Twice this year, IHI has led a study tour down to NASA,” says Bisognano, who is retiring at the end of the year. “When you walk into NASA, there is a wall that tracks the journey of a space shuttle from when it comes onto the launch pad until it returns safely back home.”

 

That board also tracks every near-miss, equipment failure, employee injury and fatality that has happened across the shuttle program. And when teams see that wall, that gets them thinking about the depth of the details in such transparency.

 

“Nobody in healthcare understands safety that way,” she says. “If we make an analogy to healthcare, the left side of the map might answer questions like: Have we safely admitted patients into the hospital? Do we understand everything about that patient’s care and life outside the hospital, and have we brought that knowledge to the people who will be caring for that patient in the hospital?”

 

The other side of the board, Bisognano says, could provide responses to the question, “Have we safely guided this patient back into the community with access to medications, food and care?” Looking at healthcare issues from a different angle is standard operating procedure at the IHI, which can usually be found on the cutting edge of health innovation. And, while it is true that the healthcare industry is adjusting to some of the biggest changes in its history under the Affordable Care Act, it’s Bisognano’s belief that the current disruptions are small compared to what’s coming down the pike.

 

“I think leadership is in the midst of a transition,” she says. “Leaders are going to be out in the community in ways they never were before. They’re going to begin to understand what it’s like to live in a particular neighborhood –how can their hospital or physician practice or ACO create health in that environment? They’re going to be looking way outside the walls of the organization. I think they’re going to be challenged by managing multi-professional teams, because there is no way that healthcare can be provided by a specific discipline anymore.”

 

Those are bold words, but Bisognano says that scenario is the end result of what it means to move “upstream” into a community to deliver care, a concept that has been around for years but is gaining new urgency as hospitals and health systems seek to prevent readmissions. And data is the key to that, Bisognano notes. Read more…