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Hard work a key to Sally Hurt-Deitch’s quick ascent

By | July 31st, 2017 | Blog | Add A Comment

 

Sally Hurt-Deitch: “People want healthcare in their community. They don’t want to drive 20 or 30 minutes to receive care.”

 

One in a series of interviews with Modern Healthcare’s Top 25 Women in Healthcare for 2017. Furst Group and NuBrick Partners, which comprise the companies of MPI, sponsor the awards.

 

The career trajectory for Sally Hurt-Deitch was set early – so it’s no surprise to see her as the Market CEO for The Hospitals of Providence, the Tenet Health system that dominates the El Paso market.

 

At her first job, fresh from earning her bachelor’s degree in nursing, Hurt-Deitch’s boss was close to retirement. So, on top of learning endoscopy and the operating room, and in addition to learning instrumentation and learning how to circulate, her supervisor put her to work on a host of other duties.

 

“She would come to me and say, ‘Sally, you’re young. You know this stuff. You just graduated from college. Go and do this for me,’ ” Hurt-Deitch remembers.

 

Her nursing preceptors told the bewildered rookie, “Just go do it.”

 

Thus, by the end of her first year, in addition to doing cases and being a clinical nurse, Hurt-Deitch got a crash course in how to run every aspect of a department.

 

“I was doing her payroll and her scheduling,” Hurt-Deitch says. “I’d done her operating budget and her capital budget. I had rewritten all of her policies and procedures. I’d gone through a Joint Commission survey and I was doing all of her Performance Improvement and Quality Improvement.”

 

An amazing story, yes? It gets better.

 

When Hurt-Deitch’s boss retired, a group of physicians went to the CEO of the hospital with a request: “We want Sally to be the new director.”

 

The CEO called her into his office.

 

“How old are you?”

 

“23.”

 

“I don’t know about this. I’ll tell you what. I’ll give you 6 months. Let’s see what you can do.”

 

Hurt-Deitch sailed through the tryout. She became the assistant chief nursing office two years later and, by the age of 27, she was the CNO.

 

“When my nursing boss retired, I never even thought, ‘I want this position.’ ” Hurt-Deitch notes. “It grew very fast.”

 

Hurt-Deitch was born and raised in the El Paso area and, except for a short period when she left to work in Oklahoma, has watched the region grow from a close-up vantage point. Healthcare is personal to her, an attitude that developed unconsciously when she was a child.

 

At the age of 10, her mother nearly died from idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, an autoimmune disease in which the person’s body destroys its own platelets and thus, the ability for the blood to clot.

 

“My father was amazing,” Hurt-Deitch says. “He would sneak us up a back staircase at the hospital so we could go see her. He was a football coach and I can remember my mom doing her exercises with my dad coaching her: ‘You’re going to do this. You’re going to come back.’ Watching how he acted around her was very inspiring to me. I had a deep desire to care for people. I think my mother and her experience provided a lot of fuel for that fire, but I think nursing inherently was my calling.”

 

Hurt-Deitch got to see her mother completely come back from the disease, and her mom has had a front-row view to see her daughter become one of the powerful Latino executives in the country.

 

The El Paso region is unique in that it is still a border community, one whose economy is still very much based on homeownership as opposed to another economic driver. But Tenet itself has invested more than $1 billion into El Paso in the last 10 years, and Hurt-Deitch says the county has a consumer mindset to healthcare that is no different than the rest of the U.S.

 

“We are the community choice for healthcare, which is a hugely positive thing – we have about 50 percent of the total market share,” she says. “But people want healthcare in their community. They don’t want to drive 20 or 30 minutes to receive care. They want it right around the corner. The days of having a family physician and going every year for your checkup are disappearing. So, you’re seeing the free-standing ERs and the urgent-care centers proliferating because people are wanting to be treated per health episode, not for their long-term health needs.”

 

As the Market CEO, Hurt-Deitch oversees the CEOs who lead the three Providence hospitals and one micro-hospital. And, like her early years in healthcare, she utilizes some unorthodox ideas to develop her team.

 

“We trade positions. One month a year, I will leave and become the CEO of one of our other hospitals. The other CEOs will do the same,” she says. “We can identify a lot of best practices this way. It also helps us to establish stronger relationships with our medical staff and the other directors. At the same time, we may have instances where we need each other to step in and run a meeting for us in our absence.”

 

In doing so, Hurt-Deitch is infusing her leadership team with the same type of liberty she experienced as a rising star in her 20s.

 

“I have to be open to listening to them and accepting what they’re saying and allowing them enough freedom to do what they need to do in their hospitals,” she says. “You can look at The Hospitals of Providence and look at the results. What it would show you is a team that is connecting with the community from every standpoint.”

 

 

SIDEBAR: Embracing cultural diversity: A personal story

 

 

At the recent 2017 Congress presented by the American College of Healthcare Executives, Sally Hurt-Deitch was part of a panel on “Building An Inclusive Culture: Whose Job Is It?” Her years in El Paso, a predominantly Hispanic region, and her experiences as a healthcare executive gave her plenty of points to ponder.

 

“El Paso creates this very interesting dynamic because it is a minority-majority community,” she says. “When you’re raised in a minority community, you’re not raised to see color. Your friends were your friends. It was a very inclusive environment, and I was not exposed to anything different until I left El Paso.”

 

Being looked at differently because of her ethnicity happened when Hurt-Deitch took a job in another state with a large Native American population. At her first meeting with her governing board, one of the directors asked her, “So, what tribe are you from?”

 

Everyone in the room was a bit stunned and Hurt-Deitch managed to say, “Excuse me?”

 

“Yeah,” the trustee went on. “Are you Cherokee? Choctaw? Chippewa?”

 

“There was no malice in it,” Hurt-Deitch says. “He wasn’t trying to malign me in any way. And I laughed and said, ‘I’m from the tribe of Mexicans. We’re from way south of here.’ But there was also a part of me that thought, ‘Who says something like that?’

 

“I don’t think I ever fully embraced the true meaning of cultural diversity until that point in time.”

 

 

 

 

Pam Cipriano: In value-based care, nurses are ready to lead

By | July 14th, 2015 | Blog | 3 Comments

 

Pam Cipriano: “If you think about a typical hospital, over half of the personnel and usually more than half of the budget is under the leadership of the chief nursing officer.”

 

One in a series of interviews with Modern Healthcare’s Top 25 Women in Healthcare for 2015.

 

As the healthcare industry begins to shift to value-based care, Pam Cipriano is utterly convinced that nurses are prepared to lead that transformation in many ways.

 

“I believe nurses are continuing to be the key providers in this transition of care,” says Cipriano, president of the American Nurses Association, which represents the interests of 3.4 million registered nurses. “Nurses have been the owners of care coordination for decades – they have this skill as a core competency. They tend to be the most holistic members of the team regardless of settings.”

 

Care coordination, says Cipriano, is a linchpin for quality, and the industry is taking notice of the pivotal role nurses can bring to the entire equation. “That may come under many different names: care coordinator, case manager, outcomes manager,” she notes. “The major insurance companies have already seen the enormous value of having nurses in these roles.”

 

In every quality-improvement initiative, it is nurses who play a crucial role in determining if that patient experience will succeed or fail, adds Cipriano, who has served on boards and committees for a variety of respected industry organizations, including the Joint Commission and the National Quality Forum.

 

“When providers say, ‘We’re going to prevent readmissions, we’re going to prevent hospital-acquired conditions, or we’re going to make sure that people with chronic conditions don’t come back to the emergency room for their care and that they’re taking their medications’ – it’s nurses who are driving all of these activities.”

 

Cipriano herself has been driving the agenda for the ANA since her election in 2014. Yet she took a non-traditional path to nursing, beginning in a med tech program at a state college in rural Pennsylvania. Dissatisfied, she began looking for a parallel course of study to which she could apply her chemistry and biology courses and ended up at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing. She became heavily involved in the National Student Nurses Association and her career took off. She eventually earned a Ph.D. and has served in a variety of leadership and teaching roles for the University of Virginia, including chief clinical officer and chief nursing officer.

 

Her first year leading the ANA was a whirlwind, including a very visible role as the nation dealt with a number of cases of Ebola. Read more…

 

 

Nursing roots important to Judith Persichilli as she leads one of the largest U.S. health systems

By | August 14th, 2013 | Blog | Add A Comment

 

Judith Persichilli: “One of the Trinity CHE values is courage, taking risks. Our founding congregations came to this country with 50 cents in their pockets to take care of people.”

 

One in a series of profiles of Modern Healthcare’s Top 25 Women in Healthcare (sponsored by Furst Group)

 

“When I wake up in the morning and look in the mirror, I see a nurse. I don’t necessarily see a healthcare executive.”

 

Those words don’t belong, say, to the CNO of a small Midwest hospital. They’re coming from Judith Persichilli, who serves as interim president and CEO of Trinity/Catholic Health East, one of the largest health systems in the country. (Prior to the merger of Trinity and Catholic Health East, Persichilli was president and CEO of CHE.)

 

Nursing, Persichilli says, “has always been in my heart. It still is.” In fact, there is no shortage of executives on Modern Healthcare’s list of the Top 25 Women in Healthcare who have a background in nursing, including Persichilli.

 

Why do many nurses become successful healthcare executives? Persichilli says she thinks she knows.

 

“The education of nurses prepares them to be leaders,” she says. “You’re educated across the continuum; you understand the clinical process. You need strong relationship and communication skills as you’re dealing with physicians and other allied health professionals to promote a plan of care. At the same time, you are responsible in many instances for the communication with the family and significant others of the patient.”

 

While Persichilli leads an organization with $12.8 billion in operating revenue, she says healthcare workers at any level can make a significant difference in safety and quality in an era in which cost has become a driving concern.

 

“With healthcare reform, I truly believe that people with clinical knowledge – including, of course, physicians – have the skills to make the right decisions about the clinical process of care and actually lower the cost of care overall. They will make the right decisions about where patients can safely be taken care of with the highest quality.” Read more…

 

 

A devastating injury failed to derail Karen Daley’s remarkable career

By | August 2nd, 2013 | Blog | Add A Comment

 

Karen Daley: “Everyone’s health and safety is at risk with these injuries. It really is about what’s right across the board for a safer work environment.”

 

One in a series of profiles of Modern Healthcare’s Top 25 Women in Healthcare (sponsored by Furst Group)

 

Karen Daley loved being a nurse, and she was a good one. But all that changed one day in 1998 when she was stuck by a needle while treating a patient. From that one needle stick, she contracted HIV and hepatitis C.

 

Her clinical nursing days were over. Over the next couple of years, she would undergo exhausting treatment regimens. But she was determined that the incident would not end her healthcare career.

 

“I learned how resilient I was physically and emotionally,” says Daley today, now president of the American Nurses Association and one of the 2013 Top 25 Women in Healthcare as chosen by Modern Healthcare. “It was a grueling time. I was constantly worried about fatigue, falling and exposing others to my blood, and I had little appetite because of the drugs. I looked sick.”

 

Yet while she underwent treatment, she plunged into advocacy, petitioning the U.S. Congress to change laws to reduce the odds that other nurses would have to face what she was going through. The laws were eventually changed to mandate use of safety-engineered sharps devices that could prevent similar injuries. Now, more than a decade later, compliance isn’t where it could or should be.

 

“We had to educate the healthcare system that these injuries and associated bloodborne pathogen exposures were preventable,” Daley explains. “Not only were they losing workers to these injuries, they were risking the goodwill of workers who learned over time that these were injuries that should not have occurred.”

 

In hospitals, she says, “prevention often is not seen as a viable strategy because it often costs money on the front end versus money you may or may not have to pay on the back end.” Read more…

 

 

Personal experiences add passion to Maureen Bisognano’s drive for patient-centered care

By | July 18th, 2013 | Blog | Add A Comment

 

Maureen Bisognano: “Boards and leaders mostly look at averages. By looking only at averages, they're tolerating a level of bad performance that they wouldn't if they better understood variation.”

 

One in a series of profiles of Modern Healthcare’s Top 25 Women in Healthcare (sponsored by Furst Group)

 

Questions.

 

Maureen Bisognano asks a lot of them. She asked many questions when she was a nurse, and when she ran a hospital. Now, she asks plenty as the President and CEO of the Institute for Healthcare Improvement, the renowned organization that helps the healthcare industry improve the quality and safety of care.

 

Leadership in these areas, Bisognano says, has to start at the top.

 

“Many boards and leadership teams still don’t understand the meaning of these quality measures, in cost terms, and in terms of the impact they have on patients,” she says. “Leaders get a quality report that is red, yellow or green — self-defined colors that don’t tell them nearly what they need to know When I go to visit a board or a senior team, I ask them four questions to provoke them to think at a deeper level.”

 

Here are Bisognano’s four questions, with some of her comments for annotation:

 

**Do you know how good you are as an organization? “It’s knowing this qualitatively and quantitatively, not just in terms of red, yellow or green. Do you hear what patients are saying? Do you have patients at the board meetings? Not just patients who have been harmed, but ones who have had a great experience, because boards need to know where to reinforce quality as well as where to push for better quality.”

 

**Do you know where your variation is? “Boards and leaders mostly look at averages. So they don’t know if they’ve got some performers in their organization who are superstars and some who are really poor performers. By looking only at averages, they’re tolerating a level of bad performance that they wouldn’t if they better understood variation.”

 

**Do you know where you stand relative to the best? “Most leaders don’t know the answer to this. They look at their own data and they may not realize that there are other organizations in their state, in the country, or in the world that are doing dramatically different, dramatically better. And that provokes thinking.”

 

**Do you know your rate of improvement over time? “If you’re looking at static numbers, and thinking that they’re getting better, you may never know what the rate of improvement is. So I suggest to leaders that they always look at the rate of improvement over time.”

 

Read more…