What healthcare leaders need to know now

 

Industry Report: Impact of Digital Transformation on the Patient Life Cycle

By | November 13th, 2017 | Blog, Industry Reports | Add A Comment

 

In a series of interviews with senior executives and thought leaders from around the world, IIC Partners, Furst Group and other members of the IIC Partners’ Healthcare and Life Sciences group, provide an anecdotal look at the impact of digital technologies on healthcare organizations and how it affects patient care.


The insights gathered during these interviews deliver a comprehensive look into how advances in technology are digitizing the industry, and subsequently changing the talent requirements and overall landscape.


Outside of the IT department, many organizations are redefining leadership structures and the types of roles needed to help bridge the gap between data and performance. Some of these modified and newly created roles are:

  • Chief Digital Officer
  • Chief Medical Information Officer
  • Population Health Liaison
  • Data Protection Officer
  • Chief Performance Officer

In addition to exploring the influence on talent management, the report explores the impact of digital transformation on several other aspects of the patient life cycle, including:

  • Patient-Ownership of Health Data
  • Growth Drivers in Population Health Initiatives
  • Evolving Skillsets for Providers
  • Development of Telehealth Programs
  • Cultural Shifts Required for Digital Adaptation

Are you finding similar challenges and trends in your organization? We’d love to hear your thoughts below in the Comments section.


Find out how others are experiencing this impact in the full industry report, “Impact of Digital Transformation on the Patient Life Cycle.”


 

 

Staying independent – Christine Candio outlines three key questions for stand-alone hospitals

By | August 31st, 2017 | Blog | Add A Comment

 

Photo of Christine Candio

Christine Candio: “We are collaborators, which enables us to continue enhancing the services we provide our patients to improve the health of the community.”

 

One in a series of interviews with Modern Healthcare’s Top 25 Women in Healthcare for 2017. Furst Group and NuBrick Partners, which comprise the companies of MPI, sponsor the awards.

 

In an interview with Christine Candio, President and CEO of St. Luke’s Hospital, the former ACHE chair talked with us about the independent course that St. Luke’s has chosen to maintain. According to Candio, being independent keeps the organization flexible, which she highlighted with a reference to a nostalgic, beloved TV duo.

 

“We best serve our patients being nimble and responsive to our community’s needs. You have to be like Gumby and Pokey – bendable and pliable. We have that here.”

 

Candio goes on to say that it’s imperative that independent healthcare organizations continually evaluate performance and objectives in an effort to deliver outstanding quality. As part of this evaluation, she suggests three questions that should be considered:

 

“Do you have the essentials to remain independent? Do you have collaborations and partnerships? Are you trying to be all things to all people?”

 

Candio says that it’s important to reflect on these questions as you assess the value of remaining independent. Find out more about Candio’s leadership philosophies in the full article.

 

 

 

Hard work a key to Sally Hurt-Deitch’s quick ascent

By | July 31st, 2017 | Blog | Add A Comment

 

Sally Hurt-Deitch: “People want healthcare in their community. They don’t want to drive 20 or 30 minutes to receive care.”

 

One in a series of interviews with Modern Healthcare’s Top 25 Women in Healthcare for 2017. Furst Group and NuBrick Partners, which comprise the companies of MPI, sponsor the awards.

 

The career trajectory for Sally Hurt-Deitch was set early – so it’s no surprise to see her as the Market CEO for The Hospitals of Providence, the Tenet Health system that dominates the El Paso market.

 

At her first job, fresh from earning her bachelor’s degree in nursing, Hurt-Deitch’s boss was close to retirement. So, on top of learning endoscopy and the operating room, and in addition to learning instrumentation and learning how to circulate, her supervisor put her to work on a host of other duties.

 

“She would come to me and say, ‘Sally, you’re young. You know this stuff. You just graduated from college. Go and do this for me,’ ” Hurt-Deitch remembers.

 

Her nursing preceptors told the bewildered rookie, “Just go do it.”

 

Thus, by the end of her first year, in addition to doing cases and being a clinical nurse, Hurt-Deitch got a crash course in how to run every aspect of a department.

 

“I was doing her payroll and her scheduling,” Hurt-Deitch says. “I’d done her operating budget and her capital budget. I had rewritten all of her policies and procedures. I’d gone through a Joint Commission survey and I was doing all of her Performance Improvement and Quality Improvement.”

 

An amazing story, yes? It gets better.

 

When Hurt-Deitch’s boss retired, a group of physicians went to the CEO of the hospital with a request: “We want Sally to be the new director.”

 

The CEO called her into his office.

 

“How old are you?”

 

“23.”

 

“I don’t know about this. I’ll tell you what. I’ll give you 6 months. Let’s see what you can do.”

 

Hurt-Deitch sailed through the tryout. She became the assistant chief nursing office two years later and, by the age of 27, she was the CNO.

 

“When my nursing boss retired, I never even thought, ‘I want this position.’ ” Hurt-Deitch notes. “It grew very fast.”

 

Hurt-Deitch was born and raised in the El Paso area and, except for a short period when she left to work in Oklahoma, has watched the region grow from a close-up vantage point. Healthcare is personal to her, an attitude that developed unconsciously when she was a child.

 

At the age of 10, her mother nearly died from idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, an autoimmune disease in which the person’s body destroys its own platelets and thus, the ability for the blood to clot.

 

“My father was amazing,” Hurt-Deitch says. “He would sneak us up a back staircase at the hospital so we could go see her. He was a football coach and I can remember my mom doing her exercises with my dad coaching her: ‘You’re going to do this. You’re going to come back.’ Watching how he acted around her was very inspiring to me. I had a deep desire to care for people. I think my mother and her experience provided a lot of fuel for that fire, but I think nursing inherently was my calling.”

 

Hurt-Deitch got to see her mother completely come back from the disease, and her mom has had a front-row view to see her daughter become one of the powerful Latino executives in the country.

 

The El Paso region is unique in that it is still a border community, one whose economy is still very much based on homeownership as opposed to another economic driver. But Tenet itself has invested more than $1 billion into El Paso in the last 10 years, and Hurt-Deitch says the county has a consumer mindset to healthcare that is no different than the rest of the U.S.

 

“We are the community choice for healthcare, which is a hugely positive thing – we have about 50 percent of the total market share,” she says. “But people want healthcare in their community. They don’t want to drive 20 or 30 minutes to receive care. They want it right around the corner. The days of having a family physician and going every year for your checkup are disappearing. So, you’re seeing the free-standing ERs and the urgent-care centers proliferating because people are wanting to be treated per health episode, not for their long-term health needs.”

 

As the Market CEO, Hurt-Deitch oversees the CEOs who lead the three Providence hospitals and one micro-hospital. And, like her early years in healthcare, she utilizes some unorthodox ideas to develop her team.

 

“We trade positions. One month a year, I will leave and become the CEO of one of our other hospitals. The other CEOs will do the same,” she says. “We can identify a lot of best practices this way. It also helps us to establish stronger relationships with our medical staff and the other directors. At the same time, we may have instances where we need each other to step in and run a meeting for us in our absence.”

 

In doing so, Hurt-Deitch is infusing her leadership team with the same type of liberty she experienced as a rising star in her 20s.

 

“I have to be open to listening to them and accepting what they’re saying and allowing them enough freedom to do what they need to do in their hospitals,” she says. “You can look at The Hospitals of Providence and look at the results. What it would show you is a team that is connecting with the community from every standpoint.”

 

 

SIDEBAR: Embracing cultural diversity: A personal story

 

 

At the recent 2017 Congress presented by the American College of Healthcare Executives, Sally Hurt-Deitch was part of a panel on “Building An Inclusive Culture: Whose Job Is It?” Her years in El Paso, a predominantly Hispanic region, and her experiences as a healthcare executive gave her plenty of points to ponder.

 

“El Paso creates this very interesting dynamic because it is a minority-majority community,” she says. “When you’re raised in a minority community, you’re not raised to see color. Your friends were your friends. It was a very inclusive environment, and I was not exposed to anything different until I left El Paso.”

 

Being looked at differently because of her ethnicity happened when Hurt-Deitch took a job in another state with a large Native American population. At her first meeting with her governing board, one of the directors asked her, “So, what tribe are you from?”

 

Everyone in the room was a bit stunned and Hurt-Deitch managed to say, “Excuse me?”

 

“Yeah,” the trustee went on. “Are you Cherokee? Choctaw? Chippewa?”

 

“There was no malice in it,” Hurt-Deitch says. “He wasn’t trying to malign me in any way. And I laughed and said, ‘I’m from the tribe of Mexicans. We’re from way south of here.’ But there was also a part of me that thought, ‘Who says something like that?’

 

“I don’t think I ever fully embraced the true meaning of cultural diversity until that point in time.”

 

 

 

 

Deborah Bowen’s purposeful leadership sets tone for ACHE members

By | June 21st, 2017 | Blog | Add A Comment

 

Deborah Bowen: “I believe information is power. If I know something, I can do something about it. If I don’t, then I’m vulnerable and I don’t have the ability to know what I need to be working on.”

 

One in a series of interviews with Modern Healthcare’s Top 25 Women in Healthcare for 2017. Furst Group and NuBrick Partners, which comprise the companies of MPI, sponsor the awards.

 

Deborah Bowen, president and CEO of the American College of Healthcare Executives, is leading with purpose.

 

The most recent evidence is the coveted Baldrige Gold Award for the state of Illinois that ACHE recently earned, one of only 12 such organizations to be named out of 270 applicants. ACHE now moves on to consideration for the national award, which recognizes performance excellence.

 

“Having ways to improve our organization in a more systematic way is important to me,” says Bowen. “But let’s be clear – the members own the organization. The board and I have the privilege of serving our members in ways that advance the field.”

 

For more than 40,000 members that ACHE represents, having a clearly delineated plan is important. Bowen and the board recently expanded on that with strategic initiatives that focus on “leading for diversity, leading for safety, and leading for value,” Bowen says.

 

  • On diversity and inclusion: “I’d love to see a more diverse leadership community in the future because we know our leadership ranks in management and in our boardrooms don’t look like the populations we’re serving.”
  • On safety: “If we could eradicate preventable harm, that would be tremendous.” ACHE is, in fact, partnering with the Institute for Healthcare Improvement/National Patient Safety Foundation Lucian Leape Institute (IHI/NPSF LLI) on a practical playbook for executives to enable cultures of safety, which is key to reducing errors within their health organizations.
  • On value: “Regardless of what happens with the ACA/AHCA, we’re going to be in a value-driven climate. It’s going to be about cost and quality and the core of what leaders do.”
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    Having a purposeful approach to one’s career also is part of the ACHE banner, and Bowen exemplified that when she returned to ACHE as the chief operating officer from a different industry and looked at what she would need to do if she wanted to be considered as a successor to renowned industry leader Tom Dolan, ACHE’s CEO at the time.

     

    “I hired a coach about two years before Tom retired,” Bowen recalls. “I did a qualitative 360 assessment where I had former board members, former ACHE chairs and a few staff members do interviews with the coach and then tell me a little about what they saw in my strengths and areas for development.”

     

    That not only showed initiative, but courage and transparency.

     

    “I believe information is power,” she says. “If I know something, I can do something about it. If I don’t, then I’m vulnerable and I don’t have the ability to know what I need to be working on. Self-awareness is very, very important.”

     

    But Bowen didn’t stop there.

     

    “I knew that, as COO, I already had the operational experience,” she says. “But if I wanted to be a candidate for the position of president and CEO, I knew I would need to get more credibility and experience in the external skills. So, I started sitting on a few boards, and I signed myself up for more public speaking where I would be pushed to do more things and provide more insights about the industry.”

     

    In strategic terms, Bowen took more risks in her leadership. That, in turn, encouraged her to take more risks. And achieve more success. “Taking risks,” she says now, “gave me strength and experience and insight.”

     

    But from her vantage point, Bowen sees that ACHE members need to do more to become the leaders that the industry needs.

     

    “We’re in the career planning business,” she says. “We’ve done surveys on this very topic, and only 28 percent of executives have a career plan. People need to devote as much time and seriousness to their own careers as they do to everything else in their worlds.”

     

    Now that she is leading ACHE, Bowen says she is more aware than ever of the power of her words – so she tries to use them sparingly.

     

    “One of our former chairmen, retired Major General David Rubenstein, used to write the initials ‘LWLW’ on the back of his name tent before every Board meeting, and I never understood what it meant. So, I asked him,” she says.

     

    “He said, ‘When you’re the general, people look to you for their cues, so the initials reminded me to, ‘Listen. Wait. Listen. Wait.’ If I wait, someone will break the silence and talk; then, I am in a better position to listen. But if I’m the first to talk, then I’m doing all the talking and directing them to my answer.’ ”

     

    Rubenstein’s story has stuck with Bowen.

     

    “I think that’s very powerful,” she says, “because if you’re talking all the time, you’re not listening; and if you’re not listening, you’re not learning.”

     

    Listening is especially important in healthcare, a profession that’s about compassion and assistance, Bowen adds.

     

    “I really do believe that healthcare leaders are special that way. They have the heart and soul to make a difference in the field.”

     

     

    SIDEBAR: Lessons from the big city

     

     

    Deborah Bowen grew up in Park Ridge, an affluent, middle-class Chicago suburb. However, she became aware of disparities at a young age – through their church, Bowen’s mom gave piano lessons to African-Americans who lived in an economically challenged section of Chicago. When some students would occasionally visit the Bowen home for lessons, some people in the neighborhood didn’t take kindly to it. That disappointed and angered Bowen, and gave her an early determination to make a positive impact in the world.

     

    As the first member of her family to attend graduate school – and one with a lineage that included many entrepreneurs – the future was full of wide-open vistas and possibilities. Like many young people, she was unsure what field to go into. She considered teaching French. She also took acting lessons in Chicago, which set the scene for self-discovery.

     

    “I came downtown for the lessons, during which I found out I was a lousy actress,” she says with a laugh. “But I also saw a lot of homeless people in the city, and I became painfully aware of the need and opportunities to help others.”

     

    So, Bowen decided on psychology as her major. She earned a graduate degree in social work and started to work with heroin addicts one on one. Eventually, through employment at the Wisconsin Medical Society, she saw she could help more people if she was able to influence public policy and the systems that support people. That began a career that has led her to the helm of ACHE.

     

    “It’s that ripple effect that John F. Kennedy talked about,” she says. “If you find the right stone, you can make large ripples.”

     

     

     

     

    IBM Watson Health’s Deborah DiSanzo knew her company could change patients’ lives. She didn’t know hers would be one of them.

    By | June 15th, 2017 | Blog | Add A Comment

     

    Deborah DiSanzo: “The difference between a mediocre leader and a great leader is somebody who can manage through difficult times.”

     

    One in a series of interviews with Modern Healthcare’s Top 25 Women in Healthcare for 2017. Furst Group and NuBrick Partners, which comprise the companies of MPI, sponsor the awards.

     

    Deborah DiSanzo knew that IBM Watson Health was a strong company with a superior product, but she didn’t know it would personally transform her life.

     

    DiSanzo, the company’s general manager, had a routine mammogram screening. A follow-up biopsy determined that a tumor was cancerous. Thus began the process of going from oncologist to surgeon and back again. In the course of that time, three different physicians prescribed three very different courses of treatment. IBM Watson Health has a relationship with Best Doctors, a second opinion service that uses Watson for Oncology, which was trained by experts at Memorial Sloan Kettering. Deborah was given three options for treatment and Best Doctors used Watson for a second opinion. Watson recommended one over the others, and today DiSanzo is cancer-free.

     

    “I talk to oncologists every day in my work, but I was blown away that there was this much variability in my own care,” DiSanzo says. “You think if you go to three oncologists at the same academic medical center that you are going to get the same recommendation for treatment – you are not. But the oncologists at Memorial Sloan Kettering took the time to train Watson on what their best practices are. And that gave me peace of mind.”

     

    She is hopeful that Watson Oncology can help many more patients.

     

    “On average, first-time cancer treatments work about 30 percent of the time. We can help. Watson’s Oncology solutions will absolutely reduce the variability in cancer care. It can point doctors to medicine or treatments that they might not have read about, or a clinical trial they might not know about. It makes a difference.”

     

    Making a difference is the reason she is involved in healthcare, DiSanzo says. As someone who has worked at the intersection of healthcare and technology since 1988, she has experienced her share of ups and downs. One down that turned into an up was when she worked for Heartstream, a defibrillator company. “The founder of Heartstream used to tell me, ‘Deborah, just focus on saving lives, and the money will come.’ I confess that I only half-heartedly believed him.”

     

    Heartstream’s defibrillator weighed four pounds, compared to the industry standard of 18 pounds, and other manufacturers derided Heartstream’s device as too small and defective. Their market share was tiny. But then Delta Airlines agreed to a trial run in May 1999. Delta put 30 defibrillators on 30 planes and trained 30 flight attendants on its use. On the flight home from the training, an attendant went into cardiac arrest. A fellow flight attendant and a couple medical professionals who were on the plane used the defibrillator and it saved her life.

     

    “This woman was 39 years old and had a 2-year-old and a 1-year-old daughter,” DiSanzo remembers. “She was a runner and a vegetarian. She wasn’t like a typical cardiac-arrest victim.”

     

    Four months later, DiSanzo was testifying before Congress about the need for defibrillators in airports and on planes. A woman approached her and the flight attendant who was saved introduced herself and said, “I was dead and now I’m alive. Thanks to what you do, I get to hug my daughters and smell the flowers in my garden.”

     

    Recalling those words today, DiSanzo simply says, “I will never forget that.”

     

    And the words of Heartstream’s founder, about “save lives, and the money will come”? After the flight attendant’s life was saved, Delta put the defibrillator on all their planes. The other airlines soon followed suit, and Heartstream earned 70 percent of the business.

     

    Not all of her experiences have turned out that way – and DiSanzo says that has made her a better leader.

     

    “The difference between a mediocre leader and a great leader is somebody who can manage through difficult times. I could list 100 difficult times that have made me the leader that I am,” she says with a laugh. “But that’s where you learn the most.”

     

    She also learned leadership lessons from her parents. Her father was an insurance salesman who belonged to a union, as odd as that sounds. “They went on strike, and we needed money, so my father went out and drove a cab. That stuck with me. It showed me you’re never too good to do anything.” From her mother, she learned reinvention. At 55, DiSanzo’s mom was laid off from her accounting job. Rather than retiring, she followed her passion and went back to school to study interior design before going to work for a prominent designer in Boston. “From her, I learned: Don’t give up. Keep going. Push through the difficult times.”

     

    Pushing through is easier when you remember your work truly makes a difference. That’s the lesson she learned from Bill Hewlett, the co-founder of Hewlett-Packard, where she worked in the ‘90s as Silicon Valley emerged.

     

    “One time, Bill Hewlett came and sat on the edge of my desk,” she says. “He asked me, ‘What are you doing?’ I explained this monitoring system we had installed at the University of Pittsburgh. Then he asked again, ‘What are you doing?’ So, then I explained the network to him. He asked again, ‘What are you doing?’ I explained to him how our imaging was better than anyone’s.

     

    “He kept going. He said, ‘I asked you what you are doing.’ I got really mad and I blurted out, ‘We’re saving lives.’ He said, ‘Very good. Carry on. Carry on.’ And he got up and walked away. I learned that what really matters is how all that technology makes a difference in people’s lives.”

     

     

    SIDEBAR: In leadership, don’t look at the barriers

     

     

    When Deborah DiSanzo’s daughter Emelie was a young child, she asked to take martial arts, inspired by the Disney movie “Mulan.” But when she was about to face a panel of masters to earn her green belt, she started to cry. DiSanzo placated her by agreeing to join her in the lessons. Thus, DiSanzo found herself screaming and ducking from the kick of a black-belt instructor at her first lesson.

     

    But the lessons continued, and DiSanzo and her daughter are now both third-degree black belts. The founder of the school told DiSanzo it would change her thinking. She scoffed, but now finds it to be true.

     

    “It’s obviously metaphorical, but it does help me in business,” she says. “There are times you block defensively, but don’t punch. I also have learned to maneuver. Many times, people look at the barriers that are in front of them. My practice of Tang Soo Do has helped me look at the openings between the barriers. So, if I want to get from here to somewhere down the road, rather than looking at the barriers, I’m looking at the spots in between the barriers. That’s exactly what you do when you’re practicing martial arts. It has helped me tremendously.”

     

    There’s just one drawback. Emelie earned her third-degree belt before DiSanzo—Mom broke her elbow and had to retake the test later. “That means Emelie is senior to me,” DiSanzo explains, “so I have to bow to her. Which she loves.”

     

     

     

     

    Halee Fischer-Wright recalibrates MGMA to give it a more resonant voice in healthcare

    By | April 27th, 2017 | Blog | Add A Comment

     

    Halee Fischer-Wright: “I view MGMA not as a not-for-profit healthcare association, but as a for-profit, well-funded startup at this point in time.”

     

    One in a series of interviews with Modern Healthcare’s Top 25 Women in Healthcare for 2017. Furst Group and NuBrick Partners, which comprise the companies of MPI, sponsor the awards.

     

    The energy that Halee Fischer-Wright, MD, brings to the Medical Group Management Association is palpable.

     

    She is on a mission to not only transform the venerable medical association she now leads as president and CEO, but to help steer the healthcare industry in a better direction. She came into her role at MGMA in 2015 with a track record as a successful pediatrician and president of a medical group who also served as a chief medical officer within Centura Health, a large health system in Colorado and Kansas. In addition, she spent several years as a management consultant and co-authored the book, Tribal Leadership. “My passion is in culture and leadership,” she says.

     

    Like many storied organizations, the 90-year-old MGMA needed to reassess and reinvent itself. It made its mark developing the cost and compensation surveys for physician practices in the U.S. “If you’re hiring a physician, you need to look at our survey,” Fischer-Wright says. “And if you’re going to buy or sell a practice, you are probably going to buy data from us. That was our claim to fame.”

     

    But the pace of change in healthcare had diminished the brand to some degree, and Fischer-Wright gave it the jolt it needed. She and her team have developed the MGMA Stat text-messaging service that gathers instant feedback from its membership and gives them a unified – and increasingly powerful – voice to the marketplace, among other initiatives.

     

    “I’m very much of a fan of disciplined innovation,” she says. “When I was a consultant, we did work with IDEO in San Francisco. So, that idea of prototype often, fail often and inexpensively, be willing to learn from your mistakes and focus on the end user – that’s what we’ve brought into MGMA. I view MGMA not as a not-for-profit healthcare association, but as a for-profit, well-funded startup at this point in time.”

     

    The results so far have earned Fischer-Wright a 2016 Maverick of the Year trophy from the Stevie Awards, the international business competition. It’s also helped open doors for Fischer-Wright and MGMA that might not have been as pliable not so long ago. When the University of Miami School of Business Administration convened a panel on “National Election Impact on Health Care Sector” a few months after the 2016 election, the luminaries opining on the way forward included American Medical Association CEO James Madara, AHIP leader (and former CMS chief) Marilyn Tavenner, American Hospital Association CEO Rick Pollack, HFMA head Joseph Fifer – and Fischer-Wright.

     

    “What really hit me when I served on that panel is that all of us want the same things, even though the ways we approach them are dramatically different,” she says.

     

    The way to achieve lasting change in healthcare, she adds, is to stop thinking the top-down approach will work – it has to bubble up from the grass-roots level.

     

    “I think most of the change we’re talking about is cultural, and I actually think we can provide analytics that show it’s possible for physicians to have more time with patients, decreased cost, increased quality and increased satisfaction, which are the goals we all aspire to.”

     

    Fischer-Wright points to successes in this vein at Geisinger Health, Cleveland Clinic, Intermountain Healthcare and Virginia Mason as disparate examples of how these outcomes can be achieved. But she cautions that each practice is different, and that what works for one may not work for another.

     

    “Every practice has to figure out what that looks like for themselves. We need to stop looking for the cookie-cutter approach because it’s not valid,” she says. “But there are some guiding principles, and they tend to be cultural, and they center on hiring. It’s like the Jim Collins approach in Good to Great – get the right people on the bus.”

     

    The pressures on physicians are huge. The introduction of electronic health records has many benefits, but it has increased doctors’ paperwork and decreased their time with patients to a 2:1 ratio. The coming MACRA regulations appear to be especially burdensome for independent physicians and those affiliated with smaller practices – and physicians won’t get feedback from the government on how they’re doing for 12 to 18 months. It’s perhaps not too surprising that 83 percent of physicians say they wish they had considered alternative careers, and that the role of physician, which used to be the most respected profession bar none, has dropped to #6 in a recent poll.

     

    “Physicians will report that they spend 13 to 16 minutes with each patient; patients say they actually get eye engagement from a physician for only three of those 13 to 16 minutes,” Fischer-Wright notes. “Providers are increasingly being held accountable for the outcomes of their patients – so if I don’t have much of a relationship with my patient but need them to keep their blood sugar in check, manage their diabetes and do routine care, what’s the likelihood that the patient is going to engage in that?”

     

    Fischer-Wright and MGMA believe there are ways to restructure medical practices to change the status quo. That’s also the premise of her new book, Back to Balance: The Art, Science, and Business of Medicine.

     

    “One of the things we highlight in the book is asking the right questions,” she says. “We’re not asking the right questions in healthcare to get to the outcomes we want. We’ve tried a lot of top-down change without achieving a lasting impact. Where we really need to work to sustain change, as we’ve said, is at the grass-roots level.” To that end, MGMA also has partnered with the AMA the past two years on the Collaborate in Practice conference.

     

    “Instead of trying to identify one specific constituency within a practice to leverage change, if we can fundamentally get the leadership – which is both the administrator and the provider – engaged and on board, then we’re going to see meaningful change within the practice that helps us get toward our Triple Aim goals,” Fischer-Wright says.

     

    Fischer-Wright says many physicians have felt disempowered over the last decade, but believes the pendulum is swinging back, due to economic constraints and new generations of workers, like millennials, who have little patience for sticking with processes that don’t have the end user in mind. “This entire $3.4 trillion healthcare system really starts with a provider with a patient in a room. And that’s what we need to remember. It’s all predicated on that.”

     

    But she’s quick to note that wishing wistfully for bygone days profits no one.

     

    “A lot of my colleagues will talk about that we need the art of medicine independent of business and science, but that doesn’t work,” she says. “Healthcare is increasingly eating our gross domestic product, and so to say, ‘I just want to see patients,’ is not a sustainable attitude in this day and age. However, to say it’s in our business’ best interests to bring back more of the art of medicine is absolutely a valid argument, and we can demonstrate why that’s important.”

     

     

    SIDEBAR: Shifting our thinking on how to improve healthcare

     

    If the healthcare industry could flip a switch tomorrow and change several things to improve the quality of care, what should it do? Halee Fischer-Wright, MD, president and CEO of the Medical Group Management Association, has some ideas about that and covers them in her forthcoming book, Back to Balance: The Art, Science, and Business of Medicine.

     

  • Ask the right questions. “We keep asking how we can make things better incrementally,” Fischer-Wright says. “But I don’t think that’s the right question. I think we have to ask ourselves, ‘What do we want?’ ”
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  • Focus on the outcome instead of the process. “Because business has been driving healthcare, we’re getting very process-driven instead of outcomes-driven,” she says. “Because of that, we keep getting layers and layers of process, as opposed to really looking at the outcomes we want and reverse-engineering the processes to get us to those outcomes.”
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  • Be willing to surrender the things that aren’t working. “A lot of health systems put things into place and then we have an unwillingness to let go of them even though they may not be working for us. We must be willing to let go and move in a different direction than what we know and are comfortable with.”
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    ‘What Does Leadership Look Like?’ Read our new magazine

    By | April 6th, 2017 | Blog | Add A Comment

     

     

    In today’s healthcare climate, leadership is not easy. We’re grateful for the insights and innovations of many of the industry’s top leaders.

     

    As part of our sponsorship of Modern Healthcare’s Top 25 awards programs honoring diverse executives, we explore what leadership means through in-depth interviews with many of these top leaders.

     

    We’ve compiled these profiles, along with pertinent articles on governance, in the new magazine “What Does Leadership Look Like?”

     

    Stories from the 52-page leadership magazine include:

     

  • Philip Ozuah’s journey from medical school at age 14 in Africa to caring for underserved populations in the Bronx
  • Pat Maryland’s axioms of risk-taking as a leader
  • Bruce Siegel’s observation that a diverse board will lead to a diverse organization
  • Debra Canales’ insistence on people-centered leadership
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    Click here to read the magazine.

     

     

     

     

    Top 25 Women in Healthcare announced

    By | March 3rd, 2017 | Blog | Add A Comment

     

    MH-2017

     

    We hope to see you July 19 in Nashville.

     

    That’s when Modern Healthcare will honor the Top 25 Women in Healthcare for 2017, in tandem with the Women Leaders in Healthcare conference. The winners were announced this week.

     

    The awards, sponsored by Furst Group and NuBrick Partners, the companies of MPI, honor 25 of the most powerful executives in the healthcare industry, in addition to 10 additional executives selected as Women Leaders to Watch.

     

    The Top 25 Women in Healthcare for 2017 are:

     

  • Nancy Howell Agee, President/CEO, Carilion Clinic
  • Leah Binder, President/CEO, Leapfrog Group
  • Marna Borgstrom, President/CEO, Yale New Haven (Conn.) Health System
  • Deborah Bowen, President/CEO, American College of Healthcare Executives
  • Mary Brainerd, President/CEO, HealthPartners
  • Ruth Brinkley, President and CEO, KentuckyOne Health
  • Debra Cafaro, Chair/CEO, Ventas
  • Susan DeVore, President/CEO, Premier
  • Deborah DiSanzo, General Manager, IBM Watson Health
  • Judith Faulkner, President/CEO, Epic Systems Corp
  • Halee Fischer-Wright, President/CEO, Medical Group Management Association
  • Tejal Gandhi, President/CEO, National Patient Safety Foundation
  • Laura Kaiser, Incoming CEO, SSM Health
  • Sister Carol Keehan, President/CEO, Catholic Health Association
  • Sarah Krevans, President/CEO, Sutter Health
  • Karen Lynch, President, Aetna
  • Beverly Malone, CEO, National League for Nursing
  • Patricia Maryland, CEO, Ascension Healthcare
  • Nancy Schlichting, Retired CEO, Henry Ford Health System
  • Lynn Simon, President of Clinical Services/Chief Quality Officer, Community Health Systems
  • Paula Steiner, President/CEO, Health Care Service Corp.
  • Marilyn Tavenner, President/CEO, America’s Health Insurance Plans
  • Annette Walker, President of Strategy/CEO, Providence St. Joseph Health/St. Joseph Health
  • Emma Walmsley, Incoming CEO, GlaxoSmithKline
  • Marla Weston, CEO, ANA Enterprise
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    In addition, here are the 10 executives chosen as Women Leaders to Watch:

     

  • Julia Andrieni, CEO, Houston Methodist Physicians’ Alliance for Quality
  • Christine Candio, CEO, St. Luke’s Hospital
  • Mandy Cohen, Health and Human Services secretary, State of North Carolina
  • Laura Forese, Executive VP/COO, New York Presbyterian
  • Sally Hurt-Deitch, Market CEO, the Hospitals of Providence
  • Kathy Lancaster, Executive VP and CFO, Kaiser Permanente
  • Sue Schick, Chief Growth Officer, UnitedHealthcare Community & State
  • Katherine Schneider, CEO, Delaware Valley ACO
  • Marla Silliman, SEO Children’s and Women’s Health Services, CEO, Florida Hospital for Children
  • Suzanne White, Executive VP and CMO, Detroit Medical Center
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    For more information, click here.

     

     

     

     

    Learning to learn: In times of great change, the best leaders embrace learning agility

    By | February 6th, 2017 | Blog | Add A Comment

     

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    By Veronica Harvey

    Senior Consultant

    Reprinted with permission from her blog

     

    As we moved into a fresh, shiny New Year last month, many of us set goals and plan for where we hope to be by the end of the year. We anticipate with optimism the benefits that will come to us from choosing to make changes in our life.

     

    What we may give less thought to, however, are those changes that will inevitably be thrust upon us, changes we didn’t plan on, yet must respond to given the VUCA world we live in (Volatile. Unpredictable. Complex. Ambiguous.). For those of you unfamiliar with VUCA, the concept was first introduced by the U.S. military as the Cold War was ending and a multilateral, global landscape was emerging. But more simply, as Scott Berinato noted in Harvard Business Review, it has become another way to say, “Hey … it’s crazy out there!”

     

    While experts differ on the predictability of change, most of us can agree that we will likely be grappling with change on a regular and increasingly accelerated pace.

     

    On a daily, even hourly basis we are bombarded with news on technological change, climate change, social change and most certainly political change. What’s more, we are now forced to discern what accurate information is and what is fake news or propaganda.

     

    When I was growing up in the 1960s, the idea of voices and data traveling through time and space without any wires or physical connections seemed like impossible science fiction. Yet today, few of us could function without our smartphones. And in all likelihood, we’ll soon have technology at our disposal that surpasses what we can even imagine today. If we cannot keep up with change as leaders, how can we expect our employees to do so?

     

    Given the constant of change, a resolution to become more agile at learning and adapting seems less of a luxury and more of an essential.

     

    Throughout history, those men and women who learned new and better ways to do things were more likely to survive, and thrive. Being able to learn a better way, a new approach, a different skill allowed some individuals to better adapt. Learning is ultimately the evolutionary advantage that we can control. What makes learning especially important today is the pace and complexity of change. The world we live in creates a pressing demand for both leaders and organizations that are highly agile and adaptable.

     

    In order to remain agile, leaders must have the capacity to learn at or above the rate of change.

     

    I have had had the privilege of observing, assessing, training and coaching literally hundreds of professionals and leaders. In addition, as a result of both my work and my education in the field of psychology, I have been exposed to numerous thought leaders and researchers in the field of leadership, learning, career development, positive psychology and coaching.

     

    As a result, I am convinced that the most important capability any of us can develop is knowing how to learn.

     

    The idea of “learning to learn” may seem strange. Typically, learning is viewed as a means to an end. We go to elementary school to learn to read, we take a class to gain new knowledge, and we go to university to learn a profession. We learn for purposes of doing something else. But it is relatively rare to find someone who has been taught not only WHAT to learn, but HOW to learn.

     

    Read more…

     

     

    Top 25 Minority Executives in Healthcare–Delvecchio Finley: Leaders understand that medical care is only part of the solution to disparities

    By | December 29th, 2016 | Blog | Add A Comment

     

    Delvecchio Finley: “Even though access to care and the quality of care is important, access to stable housing, food sources, education and jobs play a greater influence collectively on our overall health.”

     

    Classic content: One in a series of interviews with Modern Healthcare’s Top 25 Minority Executives in Healthcare for 2016.

     

    Delvecchio Finley doesn’t shrink back from a challenge.

     

    That’s one of the reasons his last two jobs have been leading California public health organizations with different but significant issues. But as he surveys the changes needed not only within his own health system but throughout the nation as a whole, he is adamant that healthcare is only part of the solution for what ails the U.S.

     

    “Even though access to care and the quality of care is important, access to stable housing, food sources, education and jobs play a greater influence collectively on our overall health,” says Finley, CEO of the Alameda Health System. “I think the evolving research in the field is making it a lot more evident to all of us that those issues are significant social determinants of health.”

     

    The interconnectedness of all those factors makes health disparities harder to eradicate, Finley says, but one way to begin is to address the lack of diversity in healthcare leadership and the healthcare workforce as a whole.

     

    “Making sure that our workforce is representative of the community we serve – that people who are coming to us for care aren’t just the recipients of that care but can also play a major role in providing or facilitating that care – is what starts to provide access to good jobs and stable housing, and in turn begins to build a good economic engine for the community.

     

    “Thus, you’re reinvesting in the community, and that’s how we start to get at the root of this and not just through the delivery of the services.”

     

    Finley has some life experience along those lines. He grew up in public housing in Atlanta, where access to healthcare was poor even though the actual care was excellent when he and his family received it. In his neighborhood, he says, the three fields of employment that offered paths to upward mobility were healthcare, education and law enforcement. He was a strong student, and enjoyed helping people, so he was eyeing a future as a physician during his undergraduate years at Emory University, where he earned his degree in chemistry.

     

    “Upon finishing my degree, I realized that I loved science but wasn’t necessarily as strong in it as I needed to be to become a doctor,” he says. “But I still loved healthcare and wanted that to be something I pursued.”

     

    He explored other avenues and ended up earning his master’s in public policy at Duke University. Finley was the first member of his family to graduate from college and to get a graduate degree as well, but not the last, he is quick to point out. Read more…

     

     

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