What healthcare leaders need to know now

 

Pam Cipriano: In value-based care, nurses are ready to lead

By | July 14th, 2015 | Blog | 3 Comments

 

Pam Cipriano: “If you think about a typical hospital, over half of the personnel and usually more than half of the budget is under the leadership of the chief nursing officer.”

 

One in a series of interviews with Modern Healthcare’s Top 25 Women in Healthcare for 2015.

 

As the healthcare industry begins to shift to value-based care, Pam Cipriano is utterly convinced that nurses are prepared to lead that transformation in many ways.

 

“I believe nurses are continuing to be the key providers in this transition of care,” says Cipriano, president of the American Nurses Association, which represents the interests of 3.4 million registered nurses. “Nurses have been the owners of care coordination for decades – they have this skill as a core competency. They tend to be the most holistic members of the team regardless of settings.”

 

Care coordination, says Cipriano, is a linchpin for quality, and the industry is taking notice of the pivotal role nurses can bring to the entire equation. “That may come under many different names: care coordinator, case manager, outcomes manager,” she notes. “The major insurance companies have already seen the enormous value of having nurses in these roles.”

 

In every quality-improvement initiative, it is nurses who play a crucial role in determining if that patient experience will succeed or fail, adds Cipriano, who has served on boards and committees for a variety of respected industry organizations, including the Joint Commission and the National Quality Forum.

 

“When providers say, ‘We’re going to prevent readmissions, we’re going to prevent hospital-acquired conditions, or we’re going to make sure that people with chronic conditions don’t come back to the emergency room for their care and that they’re taking their medications’ – it’s nurses who are driving all of these activities.”

 

Cipriano herself has been driving the agenda for the ANA since her election in 2014. Yet she took a non-traditional path to nursing, beginning in a med tech program at a state college in rural Pennsylvania. Dissatisfied, she began looking for a parallel course of study to which she could apply her chemistry and biology courses and ended up at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing. She became heavily involved in the National Student Nurses Association and her career took off. She eventually earned a Ph.D. and has served in a variety of leadership and teaching roles for the University of Virginia, including chief clinical officer and chief nursing officer.

 

Her first year leading the ANA was a whirlwind, including a very visible role as the nation dealt with a number of cases of Ebola. Read more…