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Marna Borgstrom: In healthcare and life, relationships matter

By | July 29th, 2013 | Blog | Add A Comment

 

Marna Borgstrom: “How people execute is based mostly on organizational values. And those have to be values that people lead by.”

 

One in a series of profiles of Modern Healthcare’s Top 25 Women in Healthcare (sponsored by Furst Group)

 

Marna Borgstrom was shopping for vegetables at a farmers’ market recently when an acquaintance approached her to say, “I just can’t thank you enough for the Smilow Cancer Hospital.”

 

It was a moment for the president and CEO of the Yale-New Haven Health System to reflect on why, ultimately, she was involved in healthcare. It didn’t matter that Yale-New Haven could boast that it was one of the largest systems in the country or that she’d enjoyed a productive career and interesting work that spanned more than three decades. It came down to one family finding the help it needed at a critical time. Just as all good healthcare does.

 

“Her kids went to school with my kids,” Borgstrom recalls. “And she was standing over the asparagus telling me about her husband’s diagnosis and the treatment. But she was really talking about all the talented people at Smilow who have been making a difference in their lives.”

 

Making a difference. That was the example she got from her parents, both of whom were first-generation Americans from families who did not have the benefit of much formal education. Borgstrom’s father became an ophthalmologist simply because the Army was doing manpower planning during World War II and they told him to go to medical school.

 

“When my dad was in private practice, house calls were de rigeur, and we’d all pile into the station wagon after church on Sundays and go to house calls to his patients, most of whom were older,” she says. “My mother would be home making a big Sunday lunch for us and extended family, and my dad’s older ethnically diverse patients would all feed us too, so we were rarely hungry when we got home.”

 

But what she and her siblings took away from those trips was much more than a full stomach.

 

“I think what we learned was that some of the real joys of healthcare are people and relationships. I have people who come up to me even now and say, ‘Your dad did my surgery.’ (He’s 90 years old and hasn’t performed an operation in 25 years.) And I don’t think that’s all that different from a lot of the people who work here now.”

 

Those warm memories help keep her going when faced with issues like the 2013 Connecticut legislature taking $550 million out of hospital-based reimbursement over a biannual budget, as it did the night before she paused to discuss her selection as one of the Top 25 Women in Healthcare as chosen by Modern Healthcare. Read more…