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Top 25 Minority Executives in Healthcare: Sumit Nagpal’s technological innovations at LumiraDx take aim at overhauling care for people with chronic conditions

By | October 19th, 2016 | Blog | Add A Comment

 

Sumit Nagpal: “Leadership is both about leading and but also about enabling people you work with to lead. It’s not a cult of personality; it’s a team sport.”

 

Classic content: One in a series of interviews with Modern Healthcare’s Top 25 Minority Executives in Healthcare for 2016.

 

The challenges facing patient care go far beyond issues of EHR interoperability. Patients eat, drink, exercise, do home testing, take prescriptions and talk with friends and family in a plethora of ways that have nothing to do with doctors – so can all those everyday moments that don’t happen in a clinical setting be collated to keep chronic conditions in check?

 

Sumit Nagpal and his co-founders have been thinking and working on those questions for, oh, about 25 years now. Thus, LumiraDx, the latest iteration of their ideas, could be thought of as an overnight success that’s been two decades in the making, as customers are rapidly coalescing in their recognition of the transformation of patients’ lives that is possible with this new firm.

 

“We think of ourselves as an outcomes company,” Nagpal says. “Our approach is to coexist and make use of all of the existing infrastructure that’s already in place, including EHRs, and amplify it to find out more about individuals at risk, always safely, and always with their consent – identify them, risk-stratify them, and then help them achieve better outcomes through very targeted programs.”

 

Nagpal, Chief Architect of U.K.-based LumiraDx Holdings, and CEO of its U.S. unit located in suburban Boston, says to think of their offering as an “overlay” on top of existing systems that address needs inside the four walls of hospitals and physician practices, but currently in a siloed way. LumiraDx uses data from these systems, and joins it up with information from point of care and home-based diagnostic devices, social care systems, personal-activity trackers including wearables, and even social media to personalize and customize care solutions.

 

Are patients adhering to their medication schedules? Are they getting depressed and unable to do the things that will improve their well-being? Do they feel positive about their health? “All of that can provide context and inform us as we then work to help these individuals slow and perhaps turn back the progression of disease,” Nagpal says.

 

The successes are adding up quickly. Richard Branson’s Virgin Care rewarded LumiraDx with a national contract in England to help the company manage and improve outcomes across the high-risk populations it serves. That’s on top of LumiraDx’s contract with the National Health Service, the national payer for England, to join up health and social care data for the entire population of greater Manchester, affecting 2.9 million lives. Another contract with a major corporation will soon bring LumiraDx into 12 more countries in Western Europe and Scandinavia. And other agreements are in the works, including in the U.S. market.

 

Read more…

 

 

Sumit Nagpal’s technological innovations at LumiraDx take aim at overhauling care for people with chronic conditions

By | May 12th, 2016 | Blog | Add A Comment

 

Sumit Nagpal: “Leadership is both about leading and but also about enabling people you work with to lead. It’s not a cult of personality; it’s a team sport.”

 

One in a series of interviews with Modern Healthcare’s Top 25 Minority Executives in Healthcare for 2016.

 

The challenges facing patient care go far beyond issues of EHR interoperability. Patients eat, drink, exercise, do home testing, take prescriptions and talk with friends and family in a plethora of ways that have nothing to do with doctors – so can all those everyday moments that don’t happen in a clinical setting be collated to keep chronic conditions in check?

 

Sumit Nagpal and his co-founders have been thinking and working on those questions for, oh, about 25 years now. Thus, LumiraDx, the latest iteration of their ideas, could be thought of as an overnight success that’s been two decades in the making, as customers are rapidly coalescing in their recognition of the transformation of patients’ lives that is possible with this new firm.

 

“We think of ourselves as an outcomes company,” Nagpal says. “Our approach is to coexist and make use of all of the existing infrastructure that’s already in place, including EHRs, and amplify it to find out more about individuals at risk, always safely, and always with their consent – identify them, risk-stratify them, and then help them achieve better outcomes through very targeted programs.”

 

Nagpal, Chief Architect of U.K.-based LumiraDx Holdings, and CEO of its U.S. unit located in suburban Boston, says to think of their offering as an “overlay” on top of existing systems that address needs inside the four walls of hospitals and physician practices, but currently in a siloed way. LumiraDx uses data from these systems, and joins it up with information from point of care and home-based diagnostic devices, social care systems, personal-activity trackers including wearables, and even social media to personalize and customize care solutions.

 

Are patients adhering to their medication schedules? Are they getting depressed and unable to do the things that will improve their well-being? Do they feel positive about their health? “All of that can provide context and inform us as we then work to help these individuals slow and perhaps turn back the progression of disease,” Nagpal says.

 

The successes are adding up quickly. Richard Branson’s Virgin Care rewarded LumiraDx with a national contract in England to help the company manage and improve outcomes across the high-risk populations it serves. That’s on top of LumiraDx’s contract with the National Health Service, the national payer for England, to join up health and social care data for the entire population of greater Manchester, affecting 2.9 million lives. Another contract with a major corporation will soon bring LumiraDx into 12 more countries in Western Europe and Scandinavia. And other agreements are in the works, including in the U.S. market.

 

Read more…