What healthcare leaders need to know now

 

Classic content from 2015 Top 25 Women in Healthcare: Maureen Bisognano from the IHI

By | October 30th, 2015 | Blog | Add A Comment

 

Maureen Bisognano: “There is no way that healthcare can be provided by a specific discipline anymore.”

 

Classic content from 2015: One in a series of interviews with Modern Healthcare’s Top 25 Women in Healthcare for 2015.

 

For the last 20 years, it’s been common for healthcare executives to look to the aviation industry for both inspiration and best practices in improving quality and safety. But Maureen Bisognano, CEO of the Institute for Healthcare Improvement, thinks perhaps we should look beyond the horizon for the next step.

 

“Twice this year, IHI has led a study tour down to NASA,” says Bisognano, who is retiring at the end of the year. “When you walk into NASA, there is a wall that tracks the journey of a space shuttle from when it comes onto the launch pad until it returns safely back home.”

 

That board also tracks every near-miss, equipment failure, employee injury and fatality that has happened across the shuttle program. And when teams see that wall, that gets them thinking about the depth of the details in such transparency.

 

“Nobody in healthcare understands safety that way,” she says. “If we make an analogy to healthcare, the left side of the map might answer questions like: Have we safely admitted patients into the hospital? Do we understand everything about that patient’s care and life outside the hospital, and have we brought that knowledge to the people who will be caring for that patient in the hospital?”

 

The other side of the board, Bisognano says, could provide responses to the question, “Have we safely guided this patient back into the community with access to medications, food and care?” Looking at healthcare issues from a different angle is standard operating procedure at the IHI, which can usually be found on the cutting edge of health innovation. And, while it is true that the healthcare industry is adjusting to some of the biggest changes in its history under the Affordable Care Act, it’s Bisognano’s belief that the current disruptions are small compared to what’s coming down the pike.

 

“I think leadership is in the midst of a transition,” she says. “Leaders are going to be out in the community in ways they never were before. They’re going to begin to understand what it’s like to live in a particular neighborhood –how can their hospital or physician practice or ACO create health in that environment? They’re going to be looking way outside the walls of the organization. I think they’re going to be challenged by managing multi-professional teams, because there is no way that healthcare can be provided by a specific discipline anymore.”

 

Those are bold words, but Bisognano says that scenario is the end result of what it means to move “upstream” into a community to deliver care, a concept that has been around for years but is gaining new urgency as hospitals and health systems seek to prevent readmissions. And data is the key to that, Bisognano notes. Read more…

 

 

Maureen Bisognano looks beyond the healthcare silo for improvement

By | October 16th, 2015 | Blog | Add A Comment

 

Maureen Bisognano: “There is no way that healthcare can be provided by a specific discipline anymore.”

 

One in a series of interviews with Modern Healthcare’s Top 25 Women in Healthcare for 2015.

 

For the last 20 years, it’s been common for healthcare executives to look to the aviation industry for both inspiration and best practices in improving quality and safety. But Maureen Bisognano, CEO of the Institute for Healthcare Improvement, thinks perhaps we should look beyond the horizon for the next step.

 

“Twice this year, IHI has led a study tour down to NASA,” says Bisognano, who is retiring at the end of the year. “When you walk into NASA, there is a wall that tracks the journey of a space shuttle from when it comes onto the launch pad until it returns safely back home.”

 

That board also tracks every near-miss, equipment failure, employee injury and fatality that has happened across the shuttle program. And when teams see that wall, that gets them thinking about the depth of the details in such transparency.

 

“Nobody in healthcare understands safety that way,” she says. “If we make an analogy to healthcare, the left side of the map might answer questions like: Have we safely admitted patients into the hospital? Do we understand everything about that patient’s care and life outside the hospital, and have we brought that knowledge to the people who will be caring for that patient in the hospital?”

 

The other side of the board, Bisognano says, could provide responses to the question, “Have we safely guided this patient back into the community with access to medications, food and care?” Looking at healthcare issues from a different angle is standard operating procedure at the IHI, which can usually be found on the cutting edge of health innovation. And, while it is true that the healthcare industry is adjusting to some of the biggest changes in its history under the Affordable Care Act, it’s Bisognano’s belief that the current disruptions are small compared to what’s coming down the pike.

 

“I think leadership is in the midst of a transition,” she says. “Leaders are going to be out in the community in ways they never were before. They’re going to begin to understand what it’s like to live in a particular neighborhood –how can their hospital or physician practice or ACO create health in that environment? They’re going to be looking way outside the walls of the organization. I think they’re going to be challenged by managing multi-professional teams, because there is no way that healthcare can be provided by a specific discipline anymore.”

 

Those are bold words, but Bisognano says that scenario is the end result of what it means to move “upstream” into a community to deliver care, a concept that has been around for years but is gaining new urgency as hospitals and health systems seek to prevent readmissions. And data is the key to that, Bisognano notes. Read more…

 

 

Personal experiences add passion to Maureen Bisognano’s drive for patient-centered care

By | July 18th, 2013 | Blog | Add A Comment

 

Maureen Bisognano: “Boards and leaders mostly look at averages. By looking only at averages, they're tolerating a level of bad performance that they wouldn't if they better understood variation.”

 

One in a series of profiles of Modern Healthcare’s Top 25 Women in Healthcare (sponsored by Furst Group)

 

Questions.

 

Maureen Bisognano asks a lot of them. She asked many questions when she was a nurse, and when she ran a hospital. Now, she asks plenty as the President and CEO of the Institute for Healthcare Improvement, the renowned organization that helps the healthcare industry improve the quality and safety of care.

 

Leadership in these areas, Bisognano says, has to start at the top.

 

“Many boards and leadership teams still don’t understand the meaning of these quality measures, in cost terms, and in terms of the impact they have on patients,” she says. “Leaders get a quality report that is red, yellow or green — self-defined colors that don’t tell them nearly what they need to know When I go to visit a board or a senior team, I ask them four questions to provoke them to think at a deeper level.”

 

Here are Bisognano’s four questions, with some of her comments for annotation:

 

**Do you know how good you are as an organization? “It’s knowing this qualitatively and quantitatively, not just in terms of red, yellow or green. Do you hear what patients are saying? Do you have patients at the board meetings? Not just patients who have been harmed, but ones who have had a great experience, because boards need to know where to reinforce quality as well as where to push for better quality.”

 

**Do you know where your variation is? “Boards and leaders mostly look at averages. So they don’t know if they’ve got some performers in their organization who are superstars and some who are really poor performers. By looking only at averages, they’re tolerating a level of bad performance that they wouldn’t if they better understood variation.”

 

**Do you know where you stand relative to the best? “Most leaders don’t know the answer to this. They look at their own data and they may not realize that there are other organizations in their state, in the country, or in the world that are doing dramatically different, dramatically better. And that provokes thinking.”

 

**Do you know your rate of improvement over time? “If you’re looking at static numbers, and thinking that they’re getting better, you may never know what the rate of improvement is. So I suggest to leaders that they always look at the rate of improvement over time.”

 

Read more…

 

 

Profiles in Leadership: Healthcare reform a worldwide need, Bisognano says

By | September 12th, 2011 | Blog | 2 Comments

 

Maureen Bisognano: “In every country that we work in, there are insufficient numbers of skilled people to do the kind of work we need.”

 

One in a series of profiles of Modern Healthcare’s Top 25 Women in Healthcare (sponsored by Furst Group)

 

In her travels around the world as the president and CEO of the Institute for Healthcare Improvement, Maureen Bisognano has discovered something: healthcare reform isn’t an exclusively American issue. Many countries, she says, are realizing they need to make some fundamental changes in their healthcare systems.

 

“There are so many similarities that it’s uncanny,” she says. “You need to use different languages in different countries, but the fundamental problems are very, very similar.”

 

Bisognano sees several universal issues, including finances, labor and patient-centered care. Read more…